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Thread: Rockwood A122

  1. #1

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    Default Rockwood A122

    New Camper. 55 years old. Never camped in my life that I can recall. Just bought a Rockwood A122 (2018) and will take delivery in about a week. Right after that I'm hitting the road for a shakedown cruise.

    Here's my plan for the first go around. I am going to go to the local campground and do a 2 night stay. This affords me the opportunity to run back home in the event I have the "OMG I forgot something vital" thing.

    I've been trying to rack my brains and figure out what the vital things are. I think I have it all covered but want some advice.

    Recreational stuff. Taking a folding bicycle for fun.

    Paper plates, silverware, drinking glass. Need to figure out the coffee thing. Need a really small coffee maker I guess which I don't have. (See, just writing about it and thinking it through helps )

    Change of clothes.
    Trash can / bags
    charcoal / lighter fluid
    meat in zip lock bags
    Pots and pans (1 of each).
    Dog water dish (taking the dog)
    cooler with water/drinks
    laptop with Software defined radio (SDR) and TV dongle for nighttime viewing
    Small shovel and basic tools
    Shaving kit.
    Maybe a few blocks or hunks of wood to put the leveling jacks on.

    Obviously propane will be topped off and I'll have all the requisite connectors for water and power.

    I have a generator, a 7500 watt gas powered however I don't think I'd need it in a campground. I think I'd need to be boon docking way way out before I'd fire that loud thing up. For now at least I'm going to be a campground camper.

    Ok veterans ..........please tell me what I'm missing.


    John
    New Bern, NC

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    Apprentice Geezer Happy Joe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    My first thought was; chairs (folding) and toilet paper...
    I think you have the right idea, I (nearly) always recommend that folks with a new setup do a backyard or driveway overnight test before the first trip; It lets you run inside the house and get the (usually small things) things you need... no matter how you do it; you will forget something the first several trips that you make....
    Extra blanket, BIC lighter, broom & dustpan, paper towels, that favorite spatula, spray oil for frying, potholder, pan scrubby, dish soap, extra flatware, can opener, flashlight (long runtime water resistant LED), chemicals (cleaners (verify compatibility before using on plastic), mosquito repellant), doormat/carpet/rug, etc.

    Enjoy!
    Last edited by Happy Joe; 10-03-2017 at 08:10 AM.
    2006 Jeep Rubicon; 4.11 gears, 31" tires, 4:1 transfer case, lockers in both axles
    For "civilized" camping; 2003 Ford explorer sport, 4wd; ARB & torsen diffs, 4.10 gears, 32" MTs.
    Tents work best for me, so far.
    Experience along with properly set up 4WD will get you to & through places (on existing, approved 4WD trails) that 4WD, alone, can't get to.

  3. #3
    I Have to Get Out...Again James.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    I always make sure I have the absolute essentials. Food, water, shelter and toilet paper (which is so important it gets its own catagory, plus I have an emergency roll in my truck at all times because I work co. That means enough food to last for my time there plus a little extra AND the stuff I need to prepare it with. So grill, propane, tongs, spatula, mixing bowls, etc. Water is self explanatory. Shelter is the tent, sleeping bag and appropriate clothes. Everything else is a convenience.

    I would add to your list:
    Cutting board and knife
    bowls and spoons
    duct tape
    Pam
    Leash (even if you don't need it take one)


    Oh, and a pad and paper to make a list of the stuff you wish you had brought.
    “I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority.”
    – E. B. White

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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    alot of it depends on what you plan on doing and how comfortable you want to be
    basically dont need anything, but may want lots of things
    plan on spending lots of time on the laptop watching TV? power source and battery back up?
    are you in the north? heat source?
    gourmet chef type of cooking? may want seperate cooler for the meats and such so lasts longer , not opening it for every drink
    like to shower? shower set up may be nice

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    MacGyver's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    For your coffee, check out some YouTube videos on how to use a French Press. Small, easy to use once the short learning curve is over and makes THE best cup of joe you'll ever taste.
    11.3% more sarcasm in 2017

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    Irate Mormon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    You will probably wind up bringing way more stuff than you need.
    2017: Oklahoma bound!

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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    Don't stress about what you forgot. Unless you forgot food, shelter, or water, you will be OK. Toilet paper is very important, but even that can be worked around if necessary.

    Dog food, leash, and ID tag for your dog are necessities. Poop bags should be brought (a large ziplock bag is helpful if you're going on popular trails and need to carry the bags back to camp; also some wet wipes to carry with you for your hands).

    Everything else will get worked out. Might be uncomfortable, but not deadly. If you run out of propane, use the campfire; if you run out of 12v power, use flashlights; if your fridge dies, go get ice and a cheap cooler (I keep a softsided in my clipper just in case). Nothing is a major disaster, just go with the flow.

    To prevent "supply overload", I suggest going through your trailer at least once a year and remove anything that wasn't used in the past year (exception being actual emergency supplies). You'll have a few years of fine-tuning your gear to suit you.

    Couple things with the dog:

    Get a camping ID tag that includes your tow vehicle and/or trailer license plate number on it. That way, if he gets lost people can find you at the campground even if there is no cell service.

    Use a leash. Even with a well behaved and well trained dog, there are things that you will need to protect him against. Snakes, bears, etc. Unknown terrain - that group of bushes he's exploring could be hiding a hole, cliff, etc. Other loose dogs - if you've ever tried to break up two unleashed dogs in a fight, you know it's going to end up with you getting bit - a leash attached to the dog gives you the ability to pull your dog away without having to stick your arm near their teeth. Other people - some people are afraid of dogs and will do very stupid things if your dog even looks at them; a leash can keep them at bay. A leash can be used to pull a dog back up a cliff, away from a dead carc**** and so on. It also keeps rangers and camp hosts happy. And it can help the dog pull you up that last hill on your hike when you've totally exhausted yourself.
    “One could not be a successful scientist without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of scientists, a goodly number of scientists are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid.” - James D. Watson

  8. Likes James. liked this post
  9. #8
    a65hoosier's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    Quote Originally Posted by toedtoes View Post
    Couple things with the dog:

    Get a camping ID tag that includes your tow vehicle and/or trailer license plate number on it. That way, if he gets lost people can find you at the campground even if there is no cell service.
    I did this based on your advice on a different thread toedtoes. Excellent idea and gives a bit more piece of mind.

    Before we just had dog's name, our cell #, and our home # (yea, still have a landline) on one of her tags. Never really thought that if she got lost camping...our cell may not work...and we don't have access to our home #/messages til we get home. Neither is an effective means of locating our dog should she be "found" while we out looking for her at camp.

    We updated the tag (had another tag made) so that now it includes dog's name, cell #, home #....and....our SUV license plate # (our camp vehicle). When we camp, I put a piece of masking tape on the other side of that tag and write our current campsite location # on it (ie. "I'm staying at campsite #121). This way I can change the campsite location # each time we change campgrounds/campsites just by using a new piece of tape.
    2017: 15 nights 2016: 20 nights 2015: 19 nights

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  10. #9
    toedtoes's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    Quote Originally Posted by toedtoes View Post
    Don't stress about what you forgot. Unless you forgot food, shelter, or water, you will be OK. Toilet paper is very important, but even that can be worked around if necessary.

    Dog food, leash, and ID tag for your dog are necessities. Poop bags should be brought (a large ziplock bag is helpful if you're going on popular trails and need to carry the bags back to camp; also some wet wipes to carry with you for your hands).

    Everything else will get worked out. Might be uncomfortable, but not deadly. If you run out of propane, use the campfire; if you run out of 12v power, use flashlights; if your fridge dies, go get ice and a cheap cooler (I keep a softsided in my clipper just in case). Nothing is a major disaster, just go with the flow.

    To prevent "supply overload", I suggest going through your trailer at least once a year and remove anything that wasn't used in the past year (exception being actual emergency supplies). You'll have a few years of fine-tuning your gear to suit you.

    Couple things with the dog:

    Get a camping ID tag that includes your tow vehicle and/or trailer license plate number on it. That way, if he gets lost people can find you at the campground even if there is no cell service.

    Use a leash. Even with a well behaved and well trained dog, there are things that you will need to protect him against. Snakes, bears, etc. Unknown terrain - that group of bushes he's exploring could be hiding a hole, cliff, etc. Other loose dogs - if you've ever tried to break up two unleashed dogs in a fight, you know it's going to end up with you getting bit - a leash attached to the dog gives you the ability to pull your dog away without having to stick your arm near their teeth. Other people - some people are afraid of dogs and will do very stupid things if your dog even looks at them; a leash can keep them at bay. A leash can be used to pull a dog back up a cliff, away from a dead carc**** and so on. It also keeps rangers and camp hosts happy. And it can help the dog pull you up that last hill on your hike when you've totally exhausted yourself.
    I used to use one of those old fashioned barrel ID tags that you write your info on a piece of paper and slip it inside the barrel. I would write down my campsite number and campground (if several in the area) on a slip for each trip. But the barrels notoriously loosen and come apart.

    I love your idea of using tape to add the campsite number! I'm going to commandeer that.
    “One could not be a successful scientist without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of scientists, a goodly number of scientists are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid.” - James D. Watson

  11. #10
    Denni2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rockwood A122

    Quote Originally Posted by toedtoes View Post
    Get a camping ID tag that includes your tow vehicle and/or trailer license plate number on it. That way, if he gets lost people can find you at the campground even if there is no cell service.
    I love this idea, we also have a tag with our cell # and most of the places we camp has no service. I also like Hoosier’s idea of using tape to put our campsite. I will be getting a new tag this weekend.

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